Category Archives: Blog

How To Help Foster Classroom Bondings

A Bonded class functions in a cohesive manner. In a bonded group students become more relaxed and are therefore less vulnerable and nervous about practicing language forms. Group Development Goes Through Several Developmental Phases: forming storming norming performing adjourning Stages can overlap. Sometimes a group will regress and sometimes a group never reaches the mature

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ESL Assessment: Peer Evaluation in the ESL Classroom

Peer Evaluation is a form of assessment that can help to check for student’s understanding of grammar and vocabulary while monitoring the student’s fluency, listening and pronunciation skills. One example to use peer evaluation is in a role play activity. For instance when introducing new bank vocabulary, students review bank vocabulary in class with the

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Split Infinitives Rules and Usage: Corpus Based Research

The grammar rule against the use of split infinitives has evolved over time from a strict prescriptive rule to a more relaxed “as you like” rule. Style manuals confirm that splitting an infinitive is sometimes permissible, the wording in these style manuals is ambiguous and does not clearly proscribe or legitimize splitting infinitives. Style manuals

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ESL Portfolio Assessment: Performance Based Assessment in the Classroom

In a performance based assessment students are “assessed as they perform actual real world tasks.” Students are measured in various aspects including but not limited to “speaking, requesting, responding, combining listening and speaking, and integrating reading and writing (Brown, 2006, p. 11). One effective performance based assessment is portfolio assessment. Portfolios can be a fun,

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ESL Vocabulary Building Through Contextual References

Building contextual references is a key to helping students build thei vocabulary organically.  Plag in “Introduction to Linguistics,” explains that “meaning is the relation between linguistic expression and a mental category that is used to classify objects” (p. 142). That in order to determine and classify these objects, “we need contextual information” (p. 143). As

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ESOL Classroom Management

Successful ESOL Classroom Management Everston defines effective instructional management to have the following teacher attributes: “describes objectives clearly, uses a variety of materials gives clear directions for assignments waits for attention, matches assignments to students needs and abilities paces lessons appropriate, gives clear explanations monitors students understanding consistently enforces work standards” (Nunan, 2000, p. 118).

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Forming a Curriculum

I am currently teaching a mixed Intermediate and Advanced ESOL course at a local college. The course is designed to prepare students to finish their GEDs and/or enter an American University. We are given state standards to follow for our curriculum development, however implementation of the standards are left up to the individual teachers. This

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ESOL Book Review: Compelling Conversations

Book Review Compelling Conversations: Questions and Quotations on Timeless Topics Eric H. Roth and Toni Aberson Los Angeles: Chimayo Press, 2008 Compelling Conversations: Questions and Quotations on Timeless Topics is an engaging book that offers creative ways for teachers to prompt authentic conversations with advanced ESL students and expand the students’ vocabulary in the process. 

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Metacognition and Cognitive Learning Theory

Metacognition is defined as “learners understanding and beliefs about their own cognitive processes, as well as their conscious attempts to engage in behaviors and thought processes that enhance their learning and memory” (Ormrod, 2008, p. 266). It is an essential part of the learning process. Students must be aware of the learning process in order

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Socio-Cultural Based Assessments to Measure Student Development and Learning

New ways of assessing students are great tools for teachers to have. Here are some recommendations to add constructivist and socio-cultural based assessments to your lessons. Both constructivist and socio-cultural-based assessments are typically heavily reliant upon informal observation, conducted by the teacher, to assess student learning. As an example of informal observations the teacher can

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